About Me


Linda Black Linda (Pennington) Black is a native Arkansan who is a public speaker and an award winning author and poet. Her works include a published poem in the anthology, SISTAHS WITH INK VOICES, and children’s picture books, THE ADVENTURES OF BOOTS: THE GIANT SNOWBALL, A PORPOISE FOR CARA, S.T.O.P. BULLYING and MY DADDY IS A STAR. Linda lives in Hot Springs Village, Arkansas and is a member of the Hot Springs Village Writer’s Club and the Arkansas Pioneer Branch of the NLAPW. Linda plays a key role in the planning and organization of The Arkansas Writer’s Conference each year.

Do you need a prologue or an epilogue?

Posted by Linda Black on Friday, June 30, 2017 Under: Book Buzz

Do you need a prologue or an epilogue?

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger on Jun 5, 2017 5:22:26 AM

Epilogues and prologues are sometimes enigmatic parts of a novel that can even perplex the author of a book. What are they, and are they necessary? The answer to the second question is no, you don't need them. The inclusion of an epilogue or prologue or both is purely a matter of style. Some authors find them useful, but most authors in today's publishing world don't include them in their books. I have used them, and I do find them useful.


They are extra-bits of a story. In mystery books, a prologue can be the incident that triggers the mystery. I've used the epilogue to wrap up a subplot that would be the bridge to the next book in a series.  In the final chapter of the book, after the conclusion, I simply used the epilogue as a launching point for the next story.


Some authors, use a different point of view in their epilogues and prologues. They play with style and voice to give the story a book-end feel to it. A prologue can even be in the author's voice. In this case, it would be used to explain the motivation behind the story, what drove the author to write it and share it with the world?


Epilogues and prologues aren't for everyone. If you've never included either in a book, don't worry. They aren't crucial to the structure of the book. But, you may find, as I have, that they can be fun to write, and if done right, they can give your story that little extra oomph that you've been looking for. 


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

In : Book Buzz 


Tags: prologue  epilogue  writing 

What do you think about bullying?

I'm currently writing a book and would like to get some input. How would you like your story published in a book? If you have a story to tell and would like to share it, please go to my blog site and post your comment.

Linda's Write Spot

Do you need a prologue or an epilogue?

Posted by Linda Black on Friday, June 30, 2017 Under: Book Buzz

Do you need a prologue or an epilogue?

Posted by CreateSpaceBlogger on Jun 5, 2017 5:22:26 AM

Epilogues and prologues are sometimes enigmatic parts of a novel that can even perplex the author of a book. What are they, and are they necessary? The answer to the second question is no, you don't need them. The inclusion of an epilogue or prologue or both is purely a matter of style. Some authors find them useful, but most authors in today's publishing world don't include them in their books. I have used them, and I do find them useful.


They are extra-bits of a story. In mystery books, a prologue can be the incident that triggers the mystery. I've used the epilogue to wrap up a subplot that would be the bridge to the next book in a series.  In the final chapter of the book, after the conclusion, I simply used the epilogue as a launching point for the next story.


Some authors, use a different point of view in their epilogues and prologues. They play with style and voice to give the story a book-end feel to it. A prologue can even be in the author's voice. In this case, it would be used to explain the motivation behind the story, what drove the author to write it and share it with the world?


Epilogues and prologues aren't for everyone. If you've never included either in a book, don't worry. They aren't crucial to the structure of the book. But, you may find, as I have, that they can be fun to write, and if done right, they can give your story that little extra oomph that you've been looking for. 


-Richard

https://createspacecommunity.s3.amazonaws.com/Resources Contributors/RidleyHeadshot_blog.jpg

Richard Ridley is an award winning author and paid CreateSpace contributor.

In : Book Buzz 


Tags: prologue  epilogue  writing 

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